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GEORGE SAINTSBURY
Contents:
  1. LIST OF ILLUSTRATION
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You can, indeed, also see work of his at Assisi; but it is not likely you will stop there, to any purpose. At Padua there is much; but only of one period. At Florence, which is his birthplace, you can see pictures by him of every date,… If there is one artist, more than another, whose work it is desirable that you should examine in Florence, supposing that you care for old art at all, it is Giotto. At Florence, which is his birthplace, you can see pictures by him of every date, and every kind. But you had surely better see, first, what is of his best time and of the best kind.

He painted very small pictures and very large—painted from the age of twelve to sixty—painted some subjects carelessly which he had little interest in—some carefully with all his heart. You would surely like, and it would certainly be wise, to see him first in his strong and earnest work,—to see a painting by him, if possible, of large size, and wrought with his full strength, and of a subject pleasing to him. And if it were, also, a subject interesting to yourself,—better still. Now, if indeed you are interested in old art, you cannot but know the power of the thirteenth century.

You know that the character of it was concentrated in, and to the full expressed by, its best king, St. You know St. Louis was a Franciscan, and that the Franciscans, for whom Giotto was continually painting under Dante's advice, were prouder of him than of any other of their royal brethren or sisters. If Giotto ever would imagine anybody with care and delight, it would be St. Louis, if it chanced that anywhere he had St.

Louis to paint. The work now laid before the public originated in indignation at the shallow and false criticism of the periodicals of the day on the works of the great living artist to whom it principally refers.

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It was intended to be a short pamphlet, reprobating the matter and style of those critiques, and pointing out their perilous tendency, as guides of public feeling. But, as point after point presented it… The work now laid before the public originated in indignation at the shallow and false criticism of the periodicals of the day on the works of the great living artist to whom it principally refers. But, as point after point presented itself for demonstration, I found myself compelled to amplify what was at first a letter to the Editor of a Review, into something very like a treatise on art, to which I was obliged to give the more consistency and completeness, because it advocated opinions which, to the ordinary connoisseur, will sound heretical.

I now scarcely know whether I should announce it is an Essay on Landscape Painting, and apologize for its frequent reference to the works of a particular master; or, announcing it as a critique on particular works, apologize for its lengthy discussion of general principles. He was perhaps the most celebrated decorative artist of the 18th century. He also painted several portraits of his illustrious patroness, Madame de Pompadour. Along with his painting, Boucher also designed theatre costumes and sets, closely parallel his own style of painting.

Tapestry design was also a concern. For the Beauvais tapestry workshops he first designed a series of "Italian festivals" in , which proved to be very successful and often rewoven over the years, and then, commissioned in , a suite of the story of Cupid and Psyche. During two decades involvement with the Beauvais tapestry workshops Boucher produced designs for six series of hangings in all. Only his appointment in as director of the rival Gobelins terminated the association. He was also called upon for designs for court festivities organized by that section of the Kings household called the Menus-Plaisirs du Roi and for the opera and for royal chateaux Versailles, Fontainebleau and Choisy.

His designs for all of the aforementioned augmented his earlier reputation, resulting in many engravings from his work and even reproduction of his designs on porcelain and biscuit-ware at the Vincennes and Sevres factories. From bombardment of Fort Sumter to the Union Cavalry's triumphant victory parade down Pennsylvania Avenue, here is America's bloodiest and most dramatic struggle captured for eternity in hundreds of photographs and penetrating commentary.

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No historical narrative could, on its own, convey the grim bitterness and waste of this divisive war more graphically than these early photographs. Zamieszczone przyk? W zestawie znajduj? When, more than ten years ago, I wrote the first article on Remy de Gourmont which, so far as I know, appeared in AmericaNorth America, bien entendu, for the author of La Culture des Idees and Le Chemin de Velours was already well known and admired in such South American literary capitals as Rio de Janeiro, Buenos Aires, and La Platait was refused by one editor on the ground that he could not assu… When, more than ten years ago, I wrote the first article on Remy de Gourmont which, so far as I know, appeared in AmericaNorth America, bien entendu, for the author of La Culture des Idees and Le Chemin de Velours was already well known and admired in such South American literary capitals as Rio de Janeiro, Buenos Aires, and La Platait was refused by one editor on the ground that he could not assume the responsibility of presenting a writer of Gourmonts dangerous, subversive, and immoral tendencies to the readers of his conservative and highly respectable journal.

Gourmonts revengeand minecame a few years later when, at the time of his death, in , the same paper paid him editorial tribute, recognizing the importance of the place he had occupied in the intellectual life of France for a quarter of a century. What was this place precisely? An attempt has been made to define it by a recent French writer, M. Jules Sageret, who speaks of Gourmont as having represented in our time the encyclopediste honnete homme of the eighteenth century, and this is sufficiently accurate, in spite of the fact that Gourmont was no deist, and that he made a much more extended application of that esprit critique which he inherited from Diderot and Voltaire.

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He himself notes the paradox presented by the latter, who, while combating the principle of authority so violently in one fieldthat of dogmatic theologyaccepted it so absolutely and unquestioningly in anotherthat of poetic art, as stated once and for all by Boileau. Gourmont recognized no such limits of the critics function. He was, in fact, a fearless, uncompromising, and universal free-thinkerlibertinwho, endowed with a restless scientific curiosity, a profound irrespect, and an extraordinarily sharp and supple analytical intelligence, confronted all affirmations, all dogmas, in the fixed intent of liberating the life imprisoned in them.

When the Turk took Constantinople in , the "glory that was Greece" was carried to her by fleeing scholars, and she became for one brilliant generation the home of that Platonic worship of beauty and philosophy which had been so long an exile from the hearts of men. I say Platonic, because it was especially … From Florence, in the second half of the fifteenth century, men looked into a new dawn.

I say Platonic, because it was especially to Plato, the mystic, that she turned, possessed still by something of the mystical intensity of her own great poet, himself an exile.

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When, in , Pope Eugenius left her to return to Rome, Florence was ready to welcome this new wanderer, the spirit of the ancient world. And the almost childish wonder with which she received that august guest is evident in all the marvellous work of the years that followed, in none more than in that of Sandro Botticelli. Tiziano Vecellio known as Titian was the greatest representative of the Venetian School and he was recognized as a genius in his own time.

He has been an inspiration to artists like Rubens, Velazquez, Poussin and many others. In Italy, the woodcut was taken into new land by Titian. He never attempted engraving, but was very aware of the significance of printmaking as a capital of further expandi… Tiziano Vecellio known as Titian was the greatest representative of the Venetian School and he was recognized as a genius in his own time.

He never attempted engraving, but was very aware of the significance of printmaking as a capital of further expanding his own reputation. Titian drew directly on the block, and the cutter followed his characters as closely. Drawings by Titian are extremely rare. Known in his paintings for exploring the effects of light, Titian showed that he could achieve similar effects simply by line.

The Palgrave Handbook of Literature and the City

His concern for detail suggests the light, space, and diversity of forms. Unfortunately, there are survived only thirty-five to forty known drawings by Titian, though he was a prolific painter. Millet is noted for his scenes of peasant farmers; he can be categorized as part of the movements of Realism and Naturalism. Millet portrayed the gravity, hardship, and dignity of common agricultural laborers, but, despite being labeled a "Socialist revolutionary," his viewpoint was less political than fatalistic. Millet learned Latin and knowledge of the major works of literature from village priests as a child, and in moved to Cherbourg to study painting.

His first Salon submission, in , but his second, a portrait, was accepted in After his first portrait was accepted by the Paris Salon, he returned to Cherbourg, to begin his career as a professional portrait painter. His first real Salon success was seven years later, in , when he presented his panting The Winnower, which was bought by the government a year later.

His success was short lived, however. The Captivity of the Jews in Israel was presented to the Salon in , and it was scorned by the public and critics.

This painting quickly disappeared, leading historians to think Millet had destroyed his own work. Occasional failure notwithstanding, Millets popularity grew throughout the s, and he received many commissions, hosting a major showing of his work in in the Exposition Universeille.

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The next year, he was named an officer of the National Legion of Honor, and in he was elected as a jury member at the Paris Salon. In , three weeks before his death, Millet married his wife in a religious ceremony. They had been married in a civil ceremony in After he died, he left his wife and nine children destitute, spurring the invention of the droit de suite innovation, which allowed a certain portion of the sale or resale of an artists work to go to the artists family of heirs.

JOHN S. John Singer Sargent was an American leading portrait painter of Edwardian era luxury. During his career, he created about oil paintings and more than 2, watercolors, as well as countless sketches and charcoal drawings.


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In , at the age of fifty-one, Sargent officially clo… John Singer Sargent was an American leading portrait painter of Edwardian era luxury.